Make A Reservation
United States Constitution

Charles Pinckney – A Forgotten Founding Father

Charles Pinckney, an often forgotten Founding Father, is buried at St. Philips Graveyard. Charles Pinckney was a cousin of Thomas Pinckney and Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, two intricate "Founding Fathers." Charles began his career by practicing law in Charleston at the age of 21.  Around that same time he enlisted in the War for Independence and

Continue Reading →

Posted on March 24, 2014
John C Calhoun Portrait

John C. Calhoun – An American Political Theorist

John Caldwell Calhoun (1782-1850) was born in present day Abbeville County South Carolina and served many positions within the United States government.  Calhoun earned a degree from Yale College in 1804. Several years later in 1810, he was elected as a member of the United States Congress where he served until 1817. Calhoun was known

Continue Reading →

Posted on March 12, 2014
Ernest Fritz Hollings

Ernest Fritz Hollings

Hollings Judicial Center located near the corner of Meeting Street and Broad Street, is named after Ernest Fritz Hollings. Ernest Hollings is from Charleston, South Carolina, is a member of St. John’s Lutheran Church and a graduate of the Citadel. He is the eighth longest serving United States Senator in United States History, and was

Continue Reading →

Posted on February 10, 2014
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

When staying at The Elliott House Inn, you are very close to St. Michaels Episcopal Church. Within the graveyard of the oldest church edifice in Charleston, you will see a grave marker for Charles Cotesworth Pinckney which reads: “One of the founders of the American Republic. In war he was a companion in arms and

Continue Reading →

Posted on January 27, 2014
Society Hall - Charleston, SC

Society Hall – Charleston, SC

The St. Cecilia Society, founded in Charleston in 1762, was the earliest known private musical society in the United States.  Membership to this exclusive society included many well-to-do lawyers, politicians, physicians and merchants. Though, the full list of members was lost during the Civil War.  Orchestral concerts usually averaged eight or nine performances per season

Continue Reading →

Posted on January 20, 2014
The Confederate Home - Charleston, SC

The Confederate Home

The Confederate Home was built in 1800 by Gilbert Chalmers and was the home of his daughter and husband, Gov. John Geddes.  The home bore witness to plenty of political entertaining which was an integral part of the office they represented. Many prominent citizens were hosted here including President James Monroe in 1819. In 1834,

Continue Reading →

Posted on January 3, 2014
South Carolina Historical Archives Building

South Carolina Historical Archives Building

The South Carolina Historical Archives Building is located only a block away from The Elliott House Inn. The Historical Archives building was built in the 1820s and is the oldest fireproof building in The United States. Robert Mills was the architect for the building as well as the architect for the Washington Monument.  Charleston had

Continue Reading →

Posted on December 23, 2013
History of the Poinsettia Plant

The Poinsettia – A Charleston, SC Connection

Joel Robert Poinsett  was born in Charleston in March of 1779. After serving in the South Carolina legislature (1816-20), Poinsett was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1820. Between 1822 and 1823 he put his legislative career on hold for a special mission to Mexico. After his two years abroad, he ended up

Continue Reading →

Posted on December 4, 2013
St Johns Lutheran Church

St. Johns Lutheran Church

While staying at The Elliott House Inn take a short walk through the graveyard of St. Johns Lutheran Church. Dating back to 1742, St. Johns Lutheran Church is the oldest Lutheran Church in the state of South Carolina. Charleston had a growing population of German immigrants in part because of the union between King George

Continue Reading →

Posted on November 27, 2013
Quaker Cemetery Gates - Charleston, SC

Charleston’s Quaker Cemetery Gates

Charleston is known as the “Holy City” because there are more houses of worship per square foot than anywhere in the United States. The Quakers were just one of many religious sects that came to Charleston in 1681. They were granted land at present day Queen and King Street by Quaker Governor Archdale. In 1838,

Continue Reading →

Posted on November 19, 2013